Who doesn’t like cash?

There are a number of programs for cash back rewards on credit cards, and we hear about them on television and radio regularly. Those cards usually carry high interest, annual fees, hidden fees, or a combination of these.

Did you know you can generate cash back for your shopping without incurring those nasty charges? Mostly online programs, some with the option of accessing their programs while doing your brick-and-mortar shopping, are rampant online. Here is one I like a lot:

ShopAtHome Banner

I have mentioned online points programs in the past, and I still use them often. However, depending on what I’m shopping for, the deals with cash back programs such as these can be more lucrative. In fact, if you don’t hate toolbars, some will even credit your account simply for downloading their toolbar. That can make easier to find and access this free money quite quickly while it’s tailored to your own shopping preferences.  Do understand cookies, which these sites will place on your computer, and know that while you can delete them at any time, you’ll need to accept them again to get your credit while doing your shopping.

Shop At Home also includes printable grocery and brick-and-mortar store coupons and other methods of making your shopping experience better. With a mobile app, you can compare prices as you browse and, if you find a better deal, make the purchase from an online vendor. Your cash back will be credited to your account within a couple of days of your purchase, and you’ll receive your check after you reach a fairly small minimum in your account. Currently, that is $20 at Shop At Home. You’ll receive a $5 credit for joining, and if you download the toolbar, another $5. You’re halfway there and you haven’t spent a dime!

Another such program I like is:

( if you want to be sweet, use this link:  http://www.ebates.com/rf.do?referrerid=nW9kkAKagmM%3D )

Simply starting your online shopping through this site allows you a myriad of ways to find the best site for both savings and cash back. You can search for those offers for free shipping, by the percentage of cash back from your purchases, alphabetically by your chosen site, and more. You can often combine offers, as well, and coupons or offers still generate your “rebate.”

 

These are not the only programs out there, either,   Google “online cash back sites” and see what you find.  There are many sites such as http://www.befrugal.com/cashback/, http://www.topcashback.com/, and http://www.extrabux.com/.  There is a surprising number of sites to compare cash back sites.  Go figure.

 

You know how nice it is to get paid. Go get ya some!

Couponing 201: Web savings sources

image of coupon with scissorsYou’ve likely seen the little red shelf-talkers from SmartSource at the grocery store, where you can pull out coupons or rebate forms or advertising concerning new products.  They also have a great web site for printing coupons, which online couponers go to for printing their own coupons.  Perhaps the best known site for this purpose, SmartSource is only one of a myriad of such sites.  Other examples are Red Plum.com, ShopAtHome.com, Coupons.com and an interesting site called the Penny Pincher Gazette, or ppgazette.com, where you can not only print coupons but also find inexpensive recipes and much more.  There are plenty of coupon sites; these are just a few.  Try keying in printable grocery coupons in your search engine and see what you find, but set aside some time for this project!  There are hundreds of sites and not all are above board.  You’ll have to figure out which ones you like best.

Before your next shopping trip, spend a little time getting organized.  Write up your list, gather your coupons, and only then sit down at the computer.  Visit SmartSource and Red Plum.com and other sites you like, printing the coupons for the items you need coupons for.  If your list isn’t already covered in terms of having a coupon for each item (wouldn’t that be nice!), keep looking within a reasonable time limit.

Next, try some of the manufacturer’s sites.  Companies like Pillsbury, Smart Balance, and the like currently have coupons of their own.  While clipping or printing coupons for items you don’t currently need isn’t necessarily a good idea, with manufacturers’ sites, it might be worth it.  They can and will pull their coupons without notice, even while currently running ads.  Another place to check would be sites such as BoxTops4education.com, where you can print a number of coupons for baking mixes and other products that carry BoxTops for Schools.

Some stores have coupons on their own sites, although these are becoming fewer.  Check stores’ individual web sites for printable coupons.   New services, however, are springing up to replace those that are disappearing.  The Kroger and Carr’s/Safeway families of stores also participate in Shortcuts.com.  This is an online coupon service at which you check off the coupons you like and they will be deducted from your total at checkout without your having to present the physical coupon, all in addition to the store card discount and any manufacturer’s coupons. It’s worth checking to see if your store participates, too.

While it takes some time, online coupons are a great source of higher-value coupons.  You have to balance the time and expense with the savings, but it’s kind of fun for a thrifty soul like me!

My next post will cover mobile apps.  Oh boy, they are booming!

Couponing 101

image ziggy no coupons comic

Saving money is even more critical for most of us now that prices are higher and money is tighter.  You’ve purchased the Sunday paper for the coupon inserts, clipped the coupons for the items on your list, and you’re ready to shop.  That’s certainly a good start, and you don’t have to resort to Extreme Couponing and the weeks and months of preparation they don’t show you on the television episode.  No need for a price book.

Many people just toss the coupon inserts in the recycle bin, although the numbers of couponers have increased during this recessive economy.  Of those that have used them, most haven’t taken the best advantage of them.  There are plenty of additional sources of coupons and savings.  Used actively, just the coupons from a Sunday newspaper in a medium to large metropolitan area could make that Sunday paper worth buying multiple copies.  Smaller, more rural journals don’t often have enough savings to warrant purchasing extras.

Don’t forget the Sunday newspaper magazines, or monthly magazines, as they often include coupons, with women’s titles being the most likely to include cents-off coupons.  There is even at least one monthly women’s interest magazine that boasts its coupons’ total value right on the cover.  Around food-centric holidays, like Easter or Thanksgiving, coupons increase.  During the fall, with the approach of the Halloween, Thanksgiving, and the winter holidays of Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and New Year, there are countless coupon inserts with some even bound right into monthly editions.

There are many ways to generate coupons and savings.  Over the next few posts, I’ll mention a few.  Don’t worry, I won’t slap you with the coupon inserts; it’s not that hard.  But you can save a few bucks each week and that will add up to a nice Christmas Club, yanno?

image pile of clipped coupons